Bladder Cancer

Topics of a general nature that relate to anything to do with the 6th Battalion 31st Infantry that served in Vietnam.
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Delta75
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Bladder Cancer

Postby Delta75 » Thu Mar 26, 2020 10:13 pm

Hello My 6/31st Brothers,

One of our 6/31st Brothers, Lt Sam Martin, Delta Company, 1969, has been battling bladder cancer for some time now, and as you probably know, the VA has yet to agree that bladder cancer could have been caused by Agent Orange. They have denied all cases that have been appealed to date. Sam has hired an attorney and they will be appealing his case on April 8. It would help his case greatly if he could provide the names and email addresses of any Vietnam vets who have experienced bladder cancer. For those men who might not be aware, sadly we lost Captain David Quisenberry, Delta Company, 1969, to bladder cancer in September 2018.

Sam would greatly appreciate any information that you could provide. If you also know of other Vietnam vets outside of the 6/31st would have experienced bladder cancer, he would greatly appreciate it if you could provide their names and contact information.

Thank you in advance for your support.

Take Care My Brothers...stay safe from that darn corona virus.
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Delta75
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Re: Bladder Cancer

Postby Delta75 » Thu Mar 26, 2020 11:51 pm

It is so difficult for me to understand why the bladder would not be considered the primary place to look for Agent Orange caused cancer. The reason being that when we grunts ran out of water, we took water from the large jugs that the Vietnamese people caught rain water in. The rain water ran off of their thatched roofs which had been sprayed with AO, as the planes sprayed the near by canals and rivers.....or we took water from those same rivers and canals...adding an Iodine tab prior to drinking. After drinking where do the doctors think that the AO laced water went? Kidney, bladder, prostate and then out. Out of these three areas, the VA considers only the prostate as AO susceptible.
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Niner Delta
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Re: Bladder Cancer

Postby Niner Delta » Fri Mar 27, 2020 9:16 pm

My opinion is that the people that make the decisions about what is covered by
the VA concerning Agent Orange, have absolutely no idea where we went, what we
drank and ate, or how we lived over there. If they ever were in a combat zone, they
were behind a desk or in a clean hospital and have no idea what the field was like.
(I will now end my rant and step down off my soapbox.... :D )

.
Vern.
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Delta75
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Re: Bladder Cancer

Postby Delta75 » Sat Mar 28, 2020 5:38 am

My Thoughts on Bladder Cancer:

My undergraduate degree, received prior to going to Vietnam, was in Psychology with a strong minor in Biology. My study of biology has led me to many questions as to the impact that Agent Orange might have upon our bodies. I understand that the liver and the kidneys are the primary toxin filtration organs in the body, and if they are doing their jobs effectively they will remove toxins prior to the urine entering the bladder. Urine is, therefore, considered non-toxic, although it contains urea and other substances which can be toxic if they are not excreted and reach high concentrations in the body. These "other substances" are what concern me as to bladder cancer. Especially when one considers how long these "substances" might remain in the bladder prior to elimination. I can only assume that these "other substances" are what the VA considers as the cause of prostate cancer.

In Vietnam, exposure to Agent Orange varied as where one was located and as to their Military Occupation Specialty (MOS). Even in the rear, one could be exposed via touching or breathing. This certainly applied to aircrews loading, unloading, and spraying this agent. However, I don't believe that anyone could exceed the exposure that a combat infantryman received, and, even this could vary based upon their Area of Operation (AO).

For example...the infantryman in the north and central corps of Vietnam, in most cases, were not operating in a countryside having heavy population densities, nor were there canals and rivers everywhere. These men were certainly exposed to Agent Orange as they laid in ambush positions at night and as they did recon movements by day; however, that was probably pretty much the limit of their exposure.

The infantryman in the southern corp, however, operated in a completely different environment. They operated in areas having a much greater population density as well as an area covered with canals and rivers. So one might ask, therefore,..."What was the difference as it applies to the exposure to Agent Orange?". Remember that, in the southern corp, Agent Orange was frequently sprayed along the rivers and canals in order to remove potential enemy ambush sites; therefore, the southern infantryman not only laid in Agent Orange during their night ambushes and walked thru it during daily recon movements, they were also exposed to it as they waded the rivers and canals. In addition, they frequently drank the water. There were times when these platoons were unable to get drinking water resupplied during an operation, and these men went thru several canteens of water each day....new men often went thru several canteens within an hour. It is, therefore, so difficult for me to understand why the bladder would not be considered the primary place to look for Agent Orange caused cancer. The reason being that when these grunts ran out of water, they took water from the large jugs that the Vietnamese people caught rain water in. The rain water ran off of their thatched roofs which had been sprayed with Agent Orange, as the planes sprayed the near by canals and rivers.....or they took water from those same rivers and canals...adding an Iodine tab prior to drinking. After drinking where do the doctors think that the Agent Orange laced water went? Kidney, bladder, prostate and then out. Out of these three areas, the VA seems to considers only the prostate as Agent Orange susceptible. Why is this the case? I have personally asked several VA doctors this question, and they have all been either unable or unwilling to provide me with an answer.

That's my input.
SSG Jerry L. White
3rd Platoon
Delta Company
6th/31st
9th Infantry Division
1969
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Re: Bladder Cancer

Postby Niner Alpha » Sat Mar 28, 2020 10:01 am

It seems to me we drank unseen water. Water went from metal water buffalo to opaque green canteen. The only examination we did was to examine the taste. If we were really thirsty, like most of the time, the taste didn't count. But remember the resupply bladders? White plastic jugs. They weren't hiding the color of the water. Generally they looked like they contained the draining of a mudhole. Nice and orange in color. But....guess the Army was only worried about malaria and other such foreign disease factors. If the bugs were dead the particulates that remained didn't matter.

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